(Lack of) Penalty Replays

<< First  < Prev   1   2   Next >  Last >> 
  • Sunday, November 25, 2018 11:01 AM
    Message # 6931628

    UNO, and most college hockey teams-maybe all of them- do not show replays of penalties on the arena video board. This means the people who have paid the most to see a game get the least amount of explanation of what is going on and why. People watching at home will see replays from all available angles, along with an explanation of what to look for and what the rules of the penalty being questioned are. People at the game get 'The Play (or goal) is Under Review', with no explanation of WHY.

    UNO tried for a while to have re-enactments of penalties and hockey terminolgoy to teach new fans what the different penalties are, but without it happening at game speed the potential penalty is a blink of an eye but for the demonstration the video is slowed down. 

    If they would show replays of penalties then I believe that at least 95% of the time the video would show conclusively that the referee was right. Of the remaining 5% the camera angle may be bad or non existent, and on a small percentage it will show that the call was wrong. 

    Watch a game on tv. Especially if you are a fan of a team, when a penalty is called the first thing you probably think is that the ref is blind or prejudiced. Then the replay comes on and........the call was correct. And most of the time this is what the replay shows. The few times it doesn't is why replay exists. 

    The fans at the game deserve to know what is going on and why. I've heard the 'we don't want to cause an uproar by showing a controversial play' but most times a lack of information will cause more of an uproar than a definitive replay that ultimately gets the call right.  

    When I watch UNO games at my home, especially on network tv where the announcers are at least trying to sound impartial I see that what I thought was a bad call wasn't, and that maybe that blind linesman or referee actually did make the right call.

    If College Hockey in general, and UNO and the NCHC in particular, want to both educate fans about the game AND prove that the refereeing is both fair and being done properly then show the replays. 


  • Sunday, November 25, 2018 1:15 PM
    Reply # 6931728 on 6931628

    I wonder if part of it is simply staffing on the production crew.

    Goal reviews are easy most times - you have raftercam always in position.

    But Baxter basically runs a 3-camera operation. You're not always going to have a camera in position to catch the infraction. Or in the case of Galt's butt-end, nobody was watching for it.

    I don't think there is anyone watching or saving isolated shots of the cameras to pick up the fouls, and sometimes they're not on any shot - not even the wide-game shot.

    Heck, we couldn't even get a camera on the ice to give the parents some deserved face time.

  • Sunday, November 25, 2018 1:17 PM
    Reply # 6931729 on 6931628
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Good analysis, Ed... I’d like to see replays because of the speed of the plays, the distance we sit from the ice. 

    As you suggest, I think fans would find that refs make the correct call most of the time if they could see the replay. 

    Plus, I’m continually distracted by Twitter that I miss stuff...

  • Sunday, November 25, 2018 7:50 PM
    Reply # 6932076 on 6931728
    Anonymous wrote:

    I wonder if part of it is simply staffing on the production crew.

    Goal reviews are easy most times - you have raftercam always in position.

    But Baxter basically runs a 3-camera operation. You're not always going to have a camera in position to catch the infraction. Or in the case of Galt's butt-end, nobody was watching for it.

    I don't think there is anyone watching or saving isolated shots of the cameras to pick up the fouls, and sometimes they're not on any shot - not even the wide-game shot.

    Heck, we couldn't even get a camera on the ice to give the parents some deserved face time.


    If there isn’t a camera view then the call on the ice stands, which is what happens now.  But tell the fans WHY the goal is under review or what the refs are reviewing. Keeping it secret definitely isn’t making people think that everything is on the up and up. It’s when officials or announcers don’t say something that all the conspiracy theories start breaking out.
  • Sunday, November 25, 2018 10:25 PM
    Reply # 6932228 on 6931628
    That might be an issue with the review process. I think you can challenge for offsides, but all reviewable points of the play may still be subject to the review. I'm not sure what is being reviewed needs to be declared.
  • Sunday, November 25, 2018 10:40 PM
    Reply # 6932232 on 6931628

    Ed:

    93.7 Team Timeout Request/Coach's Challenge -

    ...When any aspect of the video replay criteria is challenged, it allows the referee to utilize all aspects of the review criteria to be judged (e.g., high stick challenged, but video shows the puck was kicked into the goal)...

    The rule was amended this year to include the above statement.

  • Monday, November 26, 2018 9:20 AM
    Reply # 6932956 on 6931628

    There is an initial call made that stops the action while the play is reviewed. If you are watching the game on CBS Sports or the Big10 network or a Fox affiliate then you know what that original reason is. If you are physically at the game and you don’t know the right people to ask you don’t know at the time and you won’t find out from local sports news sources later on either. 

    For every challenge the refs have to be in contact with review officials. They know, and it wouldn’t take much to announce at the arena, what that initial reason is. If they are looking at video then let the fans at the arena see that video as well. We aren’t changing the rules or adding new stipulations, it’s simply telling fans what is going on and showing them. As I said in my other posts, seeing the play usually, and by usually I mean high 90’s percentage, shows that the refs got it right. Seeing the replay and knowing what was called teaches fans the rules of the game better than vague statements do. There will still be calls that either aren’t on any camera or the angle doesn’t clearly show what happened. That already happens now, and I assume that the way it is handled is that the call in the ice stands. Absolutely nothing needs to change about how the game is officiated. Most non-reviewed penalties are already announced, but when something is challenged and under review then nothing is said, or shown at the arena. 

    Announce the penalty, and show the video if it was caught on camera. If a challenge is made, announce what that challenge is. Show it. You won’t get 100% agreement but most people when they see a replay will admit that the officials were right. No rule changes, just letting the fans AT the game get the same information someone watching it on a non NCHC broadcast gets, and has gotten for years. 

  • Monday, November 26, 2018 1:45 PM
    Reply # 6933423 on 6931628

    I don't think showing the replay during an official review/challenge will be feasible in the near-term. However, one peeve that I have is that the referees are not mic'd into the arena PA system. I think having them mic'd up and allowing them to explain reviews would greatly help with fans' understanding of the games.

    Of course, there are times where I don't want to hear their explanations. ;)

  • Monday, November 26, 2018 10:30 PM
    Reply # 6934196 on 6931628
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Because hockey is a game that many people don’t understand as well as football, basketball, or baseball (in non-traditional markets), it would be helpful for “casual fans” to have replays and mic’d up refs. 

    Obviously, replays aren’t going to be implemented during games anytime soon, but it would be helpful if they were because:

    1. Hockey isn’t something that is watched on TV in the numbers other sports are watched.
    2. Hockey is a game with a number of intricacies that aren’t fully appreciated during a fast-paced game in person. 

    Part of the reason hockey has trouble catching on in new markets is that it is a very “geographic” sport. In my mind, a greater understanding of the game would increase its appeal. 

    Part of that comes with making the “in person” game experience more relatable to casual fans — which means you make it more like TV. 

    The purist in me doesn’t like that idea, but the realist in me knows that many attendees at hockey games can feel intimidated watching a sport they don’t understand. 

    I’m not altogether sure “why” the NCAA won’t allow penalty replays to be shown during a game. Is it a concern about “ugly fan behavior”...if the refs get the call wrong?

    Perhaps it is. 

    I’d just argue that it would help educate spectators who don’t understand the sport — and shorten the learning curve over the long haul for people new to the game.

    At the end of the day, hockey is a sport that is a lot of fun to watch. I think more people would come to love the game if schools were allowed to employ the technology at their disposal to help educate fans. 

  • Tuesday, November 27, 2018 1:17 PM
    Reply # 6935165 on 6931628

    The cost limitations, especially at smaller schools and arenas are something that would have to be dealt with but just about every conference now has a TV deal with a major network for at least some of their games and that provides income for all of the members even though it’s nowhere near most other college sport levels. The cameras probably aren’t the problem as much as the arena display screen would be for a lot of schools.  And most already require at least goal and/or overhead cams. The NCHC does. If the cameras weren’t already there they wouldn’t be stopping to do an official video review of the goal or penalty. 

    I agree with Jon on the teaching aspect as well. Hockey is fast, not every penalty happens around where the puck is, and if you are a new fan you don’t know what to look for anyway. That’s if, as Jon said, you can see the penalty or goal at all from where you are sitting. Goals aren’t a problem, those ARE replayed. But penalties aren’t. And penalties are the area that most fans, especially new ones, understand the least. A (video) picture is worth 10,000 words. 

<< First  < Prev   1   2   Next >  Last >> 
Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software